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Author Topic: Circular Breathing?  (Read 2608 times)
PiperinNY
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« on: December 20, 2009, 08:41:24 PM »

.... who uses it? I am beginning to use it on the practice chanter (bagpipes) ...  and the Ocarina naturally lends itself to such a technique. How long did it take you to learn it?

For those of you who don't know what it is...  essentially it's the ability to breathe while still playing a wind instrument.


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feigenpwn
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« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2009, 10:00:38 PM »

 Shocked How's it possible to breathe in when you have to breathe out to make the sound?


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ubizmo
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I couldn't fail to disagree with you less.


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« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2009, 11:14:29 PM »

Shocked How's it possible to breathe in when you have to breathe out to make the sound?

It's done by storing air in the cheeks and using the cheek muscles to push the air into the instrument while taking air into the lungs.  Done right, it allows the musician to play indefinitely without pausing to breathe.  Soprano sax player Kenny G once set a world record sustaining a single note for 45 minutes or so.

I can't do it, myself.  I think it works better on instruments with a good amount of back pressure, like a pipe chanter or saxophone.  This would allow the "cheek breath" to last a second or so, giving the player time to inhale.  I think ocarinas offer so little resistance that all the air would be pushed out in a fraction of a second.  But...I'm not sure, and I haven't spent any time trying to do it.  Maybe someone can do it.

Ubizmo


« Last Edit: December 21, 2009, 02:31:18 PM by ubizmo » Logged
PiperinNY
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« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2009, 02:17:42 AM »


I can't do it, myself.  I think it works better on instruments with a good amount of back pressure, like a pipe chanter or saxophone.  This would allow the "cheek breath" to last a second or so, giving the player time to inhale.  I think ocarinas offer so little resistance that all the air would be pushed out in a fraction of a second.  But...I'm not sure, and I haven't spent any time trying to do it.  Maybe someone can do it.

Ubizmo

I have an Indian Courting Flute made from a guy in Vermont. An amazing hand carved piece. When I met him he told me about the technique ...  Digeridoo also benefits from it.

I see what you're saying about the lack of resistance with the ocarina. Maybe as I get better doing it on the practice chanter, I can attempt it.


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“Take something you love, tell people about it, bring together people who share your love, and help make it better. Ultimately, you’ll have more of whatever you love for yourself and for the world” – Julius Schwartz
clarinetcat
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« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2009, 03:53:03 AM »

There is very little backpressure on the MO's, making it difficult (but not impossible) to hold the note and maintain pitch and volume (believe me, I've already tried).   Grin

The concept of circular breathing sometimes sounds more threatening than it actually is to accomplish...
Here are the basics from a didgeridoo website, concept can be applied to most wind instruments:

http://www.didgeridoostore.com/didgeridoo.html

Exercise 1: Fill your mouth with water and push a stream of water out using only your tongue and cheek muscles. Make sure not to use any pressure from the lungs to help. Stay relaxed and breathe in and out with your nose while making the stream. Keep trying until it feels very comfortable. This is a good exercise to do in the shower!

Exercise 2: Get a straw and a cup of water. Twist the end of the straw so that almost no air can come out. Push air through the straw and into the water creating bubbles. Breathe in and out with your nose while doing this as in exercise 1. Keep the pressure even and the flow of bubbles smooth.

Exercise 3: Slowly transition to just breathing in with your nose and keep the bubbles going nonstop. Master this until the muscle contractions you are using feel totally comfortable and the bubbles are flowing smoothly.

Exercise 4: You are now circular breathing. Keep your cup and straw right next to you. Try to play your didge and circular breathe (it is just a bigger straw). You will find this difficult so go right back to the straw and water to practice again. Then, try on the didge again. Keep going back and forth between the cup and water and the didge until you can successfully do it on your didge. Take a look at the diagrams on the next page for a visual explanation of circular breathing.
 



While droning and pushing air out with your lungs fill your mouth and cheeks up with air.


Tighten your throat to separate your mouth air from your lung air. Expel the air that is in your mouth only and keep the drone going.


Quickly sniff air with your nose to replenish your lungs while your mouth keeps the drone going.


Switch back to pushing air with the lungs and repeat the steps, your circular breathing and the drone never stops!


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PiperinNY
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« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2009, 02:35:06 PM »

Thanks for that....  I have just been fumbling with the technique



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clarinetcat
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« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2009, 02:06:55 PM »

Thanks for that....  I have just been fumbling with the technique



Most welcome!

Here is another good link:
http://www.didjshop.com/shop1/circular_breathing.html



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"Time is a great teacher.
Unfortunately, it kills all its pupils."

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PiperinNY
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« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2009, 03:53:07 PM »

Thanks for that....  I have just been fumbling with the technique



Most welcome!

Here is another good link:
http://www.didjshop.com/shop1/circular_breathing.html



Cool.. but now I want a digierdoo too!     Grin


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“Take something you love, tell people about it, bring together people who share your love, and help make it better. Ultimately, you’ll have more of whatever you love for yourself and for the world” – Julius Schwartz
clarinetcat
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« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2009, 06:35:37 PM »

Cool.. but now I want a digierdoo too!     Grin

LOL!!!    Grin

Seriously, if you have any didgeridoo questions, PLEASE let me know... I've been playing for 8 years now, and run a didgeridoo and drum festival in Ithaca, NY (treemangathering.com)

Grahm and Trish at the DidgeridooStore are great to deal with if you are interested in purchasing an instrument.


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"Time is a great teacher.
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- Hector Berlioz
clarinetcat
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« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2009, 06:37:04 PM »

Circular Breathing...   Cool

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fioIeJN9O78


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"Time is a great teacher.
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- Hector Berlioz
PiperinNY
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« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2009, 08:42:05 PM »

Cool.. but now I want a digierdoo too!     Grin

LOL!!!    Grin

Seriously, if you have any didgeridoo questions, PLEASE let me know... I've been playing for 8 years now, and run a didgeridoo and drum festival in Ithaca, NY

Grahm and Trish at the DidgeridooStore are great to deal with if you are interested in purchasing an instrument.

I just may take you up on that...  I am into learning as many different instruments. I have an indian courting flute from White Raven Drums in Vt...  I love it though I don't play it nearly as much as I should. I play bagpipes ......and hope to start ocarina soon! 

 





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“Take something you love, tell people about it, bring together people who share your love, and help make it better. Ultimately, you’ll have more of whatever you love for yourself and for the world” – Julius Schwartz
Spatolo
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« Reply #11 on: December 29, 2009, 07:21:17 PM »

Hey, I was browsing the youtube and I stumbled across this: circular breathing on ocarina:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hxhhvN9oIhM&NR=1


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ubizmo
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« Reply #12 on: December 29, 2009, 07:35:58 PM »

That's pretty impressive.  The ocarina is so sensitive to tiny fluctuations in breath pressure, it must be far more difficult than it is on, say, the saxophone.

Ubizmo


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clarinetcat
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« Reply #13 on: December 30, 2009, 05:03:31 AM »

It is impressive, but the pitch fluctuations are still quite obvious...

Which is why (even if it's done well) I don't recommend it.  Smiley


<thanks alot Spatolo, I actually listened to the whole thing and I think my ears are bleeding>   Shocked


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"Time is a great teacher.
Unfortunately, it kills all its pupils."

- Hector Berlioz
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