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Author Topic: Slobbering in General  (Read 8716 times)
Serenity
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« on: July 18, 2010, 07:06:18 am »

I am curious because in several comments made by different people they say that slobbering down one's ocarina is a bad thing. However I was wondering about this, because if you play an wind instrument even if you do not mean to, usually a certain amount of moisture or saliva will go into the instrument and as far as I know there is no way to stop this. It is a naturally occuring phenomenon. So, I don't get it. Please Enlighten me, I appreciate it.

Also I was wondering. Can the ocarina get wet or can't it? I realise the hardwood ocarinas as with any wooden instrument, are an exception to the rule and it would be best if they do not get wet at all if at all possible. However does that mean that polycarbonate, warmstone and aluminium ocarinas can't or shouldnt get wet? If so how is it that in other posts people write about washing their ocarinas with alcohol and/or warm soapy water.

Slightly confused...ok more confused than slightly Huh


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Ask, Seek, Knock. For he that asks, receives. He that seeks, finds; and to him that knocks, the way shall be opened. (Paraphrase of Matthew 7:7-8)
Nephiel
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« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2010, 11:53:51 am »

Slobbering is bad because it can clog the windway while you play, causing bad sound. Blowing hard on the ocarina while keeping the fipple covered, or covering all toneholes while inhaling sharply, can fix that right away.

Moisture is bad because it creates condensation and causes the same problem, but the fix is the same.

Neither water nor moisture will damage polycarbonate or warmstone Mountain Ocarinas.
Also, if I understood it right, the wood on the hardwood models has been treated filling all the voids between the fibers with resin, so the wood behaves like plastic - won't absorb any water at all.

I've washed my poly G lots of times with soap and water. I recently got a warmstone G and also washed it. No trouble at all.


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ubizmo
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I couldn't fail to disagree with you less.


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« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2010, 01:58:07 pm »

The hardwood MO is, as far as I know, not an exception.  I've washed mine many times.  The "hardwood" is Dymondwood, which is a wood that has been specially treated.  The natural water in the wood has been driven out and replaced by a synthetic resin, resulting in a wood that no longer absorbs water.  This is why it doesn't warp, swell, or crack.

I use warm or even cool water for washing MOs, but I don't use hot water, because I don't want to risk softening the glue that's used to hold it together.  I have no idea what glue is used, or how much heat it can take, so I err on the side of caution.

Ubizmo


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Serenity
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« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2010, 12:27:54 am »

Hey Guys,

Thanks for answering my question(s). Smiley

Serenity,  Cool


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Ask, Seek, Knock. For he that asks, receives. He that seeks, finds; and to him that knocks, the way shall be opened. (Paraphrase of Matthew 7:7-8)
MedicineMan
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Posts: 75



« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2011, 01:30:39 am »

Well I'm having a slobbering love affair with the MO  Grin Moisture management is always an issue with breath laden with moisure, but consider breath without moisture!
I think for the long practice sessions even the seasoned players will get some condensate...one solution is to buy more MO's!! One can be drying out while you play the other  Cheesy
In my work world we have antisialogogues like glycopyrulate (Robinul) but that would be extreme for folk music I think!
As a piper I have to reflect on 'pipers disease'....an aspergillus infection of the lungs from breathing mold spores that formed in the warm wet moist environment of the leather bag---thanks to the invention of the Mini-mac valve and goretex bags the above mentioned disease is hardly heard of anymore in the piping world.
For us Ocs we would be prudent to wash them out like others have said and to do this with some frequency.
I would like to hear the manufacturer comment on water temps as warmer water would only expedite removal of crusties and the like.


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Start out slow, then slow down.
Classical
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May you receive what is best for you.


« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2011, 04:12:04 pm »

Thanks, Medicine Man.  I find this extremely informative.


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Jan
Delphinidae
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Posts: 35


Whistler


« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2011, 06:06:52 am »

As someone new to wind instruments, is it common to find yourself with a dry mouth as opposed to slobbering? After five minutes, my mouth feels so dry I need to drink water.


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In music and kendo: Think not and you shall be, think and you shall not be.
Starfire
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« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2011, 10:23:45 pm »

For problems with slobbering/dry mouth (I think the 2 issues are related because your mouth gets dry when all your saliva ends up outside your mouth rather than in it), someone I know who is a sax player suggested that I hold a strip of paper in front of my mouth and practice my articulation (DooDooDooDoo etc) until the strip of paper is soaked. Use a clock or timer to and record how long it takes before the strip is soaked through. If you do this every day, you will find that it takes longer and longer to soak through the paper, and the slobbering problem will be reduced (and eventually go away altogether) over time. Of course, there will always be a certain amount of moisture entering the mouthpiece as you play, but with practice, it shouldn't be severe enough to be a major annoyance.

Disclaimer: I have not tried this before, so I don't know how it works out! I have only just started to learn to play the ocarina. However, the sax player I spoke to swears by this technique.


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cerescop
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« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2011, 08:16:19 pm »

In cold weather it  helps to warm the instrument. I played mine in my truck with the engine off, no heat, in -10 F degree weather this winter. My MO got soaked in short order. I was in Idaho falls, Idaho.  Darn near froze my cockles off.  It got so bad I just covered all the finger holes and back blew thru the fipple hole. But my right ear got real moist so I guess I will stick to the paper cleaners.


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Harp Player
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« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2011, 01:34:38 am »

The moisture in your mouth is something that just takes time to overcome. I had that problem with the harmonica, and I am having it again with the MO. It just takes time for your body to adjust to something being in your mouth that is not food.


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