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Author Topic: A good idea, I think...  (Read 8981 times)
tplumbarber
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« on: September 06, 2011, 05:34:20 am »

Ok so, I remember in fourth grade the High School band director came to our class and gave us a little spill on joining band in middle school, kinda a recruiting program if you will. Only they gave us the beastly flutaphones! I remember detesing them, so I bought a recorder tuned to the same key. As much as you could with fourth graders, we went over music theory and then we studied three notes of the scale and played a variety of tunes while all our parents smiled wildly. I don't know the state of the MO company financially or what the future holds for you guys, but maybe you could introduce these instruments to school music programs, it would be a lot greater step into a legitimate music program than a stupid flutaphone (which is a colossal waste of time). I guess my idea is that this curriculum could be taught to fourth graders and you could make tons of money! Ok, so maybe I'm a little bit of a dreamer, but my son (who is a bit younger than a fourth grader) understands the concepts of this curriculum, and I would gladly as a parent pay the extra 15 clams for a real instrument! Do schools even teach music like that anymore? I've noticed a pretty dramatic decrease in the size of our town's high school band, so maybe they don't recruit anymore.


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Harp Player
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« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2011, 05:56:27 am »

I have a friend that teaches music (and the recorder) in elementary school. I don't know how common that is.  Most of her students are intercity and she says that very few of them show much interest.  I think kids are just not willing to commit to the time it takes to learning an instrument  now.


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kypfer
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« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2011, 06:31:56 am »

Sorry, I see one inherent flaw with this idea ... the Mountain Ocarina is LOUD
A group of juniors playing recorders/flutophones/tonettes etc is likely to be discouraging enough ... but to have to stand in front of them whilst they do it loudly ... Shocked
I believe in Ireland they still encourage school children to take up the whistle, but there's a degree of national identity involved with that. In England Hanson's promote their plastic chalumeau as an introductory instrument, but they never turn up on eBay, so I don't know if they sell many, possibly because they're loud as well  Wink


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"I'm playing all the right notes—but not necessarily in the right order."
kypfer
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2011, 09:07:29 am »

Quote
beastly flutaphones!
Before you knock the Flutophone too hard, check out http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P5-WVMGqJ7M
As with a lot of things, it's not what you're driving, but who's driving it !!

Quote
I think kids are just not willing to commit to the time it takes to learning an instrument now
... I'm not convinced by this argument. I doubt the time commitment even comes into the equation initially. It's the interest factor - the "coolness" for want of a better term - which has got to be down to how the concept is presented  Shocked


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"I'm playing all the right notes—but not necessarily in the right order."
LeakyDuck
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2011, 04:12:32 pm »

Quote from: kypfer
As with a lot of things, it's not what you're driving, but who's driving it !!

I wouldn't mine being able to drive like that.


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Harp Player
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« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2011, 05:58:07 am »

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... I'm not convinced by this argument. I doubt the time commitment even comes into the equation initially. It's the interest factor - the "coolness" for want of a better term - which has got to be down to how the concept is presented

That could be.  I know school can be a big turn off to a lot of kids.   


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Scott Maness
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« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2011, 01:22:49 pm »



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As with a lot of things, it's not what you're driving, but who's driving it !!
Great video!


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ubizmo
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I couldn't fail to disagree with you less.


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« Reply #7 on: September 13, 2011, 04:39:48 pm »

The interest factor is, I think, connected to the fact that musicianship itself is simply not in style at the moment. This has a lot to do with the shift to synthesized sounds in a lot of popular music. When I was a teenager, even people who didn't play instruments knew that Clapton was a great guitar player, McCartney was a terrific bassist, etc. They knew about Ian Anderson's flute work in Jethro Tull and that sort of thing. Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass had multiple chart-topping hits of strictly instrumental music! So there was something there to catch people's interest in instruments. I have found that the same age bracket today, while still very tuned into newest music, is largely oblivious to its instrumental characteristics, if there are any.

I might add that my father might have made a similar comment about the music of my youth--and he probably did! He would have pointed out that musicianship had declined from what it was in the Swing Era when he was young. And he would have been right, to a great extent.

I think the tide will turn. I go to these open mic sessions, and find the places crammed with people who want to hear "real" music. They're not just old-timers like myself, either. A lot of young people come to play and to listen. There is something special about music played on real instruments. I don't think there's any substitute.



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Scott Maness
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« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2011, 09:54:58 pm »

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There is something special about music played on real instruments. I don't think there's any substitute.

IMHO, not only does it sound better but it is easier to carry acoustic instruments to wherever your going to play.

No more backaches lugging gear.  :-)

 


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Harp Player
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« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2011, 05:38:23 am »

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I think the tide will turn. I go to these open mic sessions, and find the places crammed with people who want to hear "real" music. They're not just old-timers like myself, either. A lot of young people come to play and to listen. There is something special about music played on real instruments. I don't think there's any substitute.

I hope you are right about that.  I would much rather hear live music, with mistakes and all, played by real people than to hear that canned over processed heavily edited stuff that you get now.  I remember sitting around and hearing uncles, cousins ect playing at family gatherings when I was a kid.    It wasn't perfect, but is sounded mighty good to me.


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tplumbarber
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« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2011, 11:07:25 pm »

I feel another renaissance coming on! I got to talk with an older music director in our town yeaterday and he had found an old "Young Musician's Quarterly" that was put out by the Southern Baptist Asso. in the early 70's. Wow, how worship format has even changed. It had recorder duets with finger cymbals, voice excercises, composer spotlights etc. etc. My reaction was Oh how the mighty have fallen! As a society with technology so so readily available I think most people just view musicianship as to much of a hastle; you know, why play guitar when I can play guitar hero? But the winds of change are blowing, our local talent show has brought a lot of young musicians out and you can see an active interest. I recant my beastly flutaphone comment  Wink .


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Harp Player
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« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2011, 05:06:47 am »

Some of my earliest and fondest memories is of a little southern baptist church.  I have very fond memories of a couple from the bad side of town.  He would play the harmonica, and she would attempt to sing.  He has been gone for about 25 years now, and she passed away last year, but I can sometimes still her them playing and singing.  Their efforts may be part of the reason I took  up the harmonica 15 years ago. Keep on playing and sharing your music you never know what effect it will have on someone. 


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bakfot
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Long ago I was a serious young man


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« Reply #12 on: October 07, 2011, 05:51:31 am »

I think part of the problem is that older generations don't play music for pleasure much these days, so there is noone providing an example or a role model for the kids. If you regard music as something that comes out of a box you might simply not think of music as something you can actually make yourself.


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Harp Player
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« Reply #13 on: October 07, 2011, 04:47:27 pm »

I would have to agree with that.  Also the culture has changed a lot in the US since TeeVee and the internut.  Now people seem to sped most of their time plugged in to their boxes and less time with family and friends (times when music used to be passed on to the younger generations).  I do hope that part of out culture will change again.


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