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Author Topic: 200 Welsh Tunes  (Read 4570 times)
kypfer
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Posts: 354


« on: September 08, 2011, 03:31:11 pm »

Check out http://www.mochpryderi.com/Tose.html for a hatful of tunes that'll work nicely on your Mountain Ocarina. The pibgorn is an eight-note pipe, so everything lies in the one octave.

Whilst I'm here, don't forget to check out Jack Campin's Nine-Note Tunebook, if you haven't done so already, http://www.campin.me.uk/Music/Chalumeau.abc , it's up to 291 tunes now!!

So, nearly 500 tunes to keep you occupied over the weekend  Wink


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"I'm playing all the right notesóbut not necessarily in the right order."
Scott Maness
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Posts: 292



« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2011, 10:47:39 pm »

Thank you very much,
Those are great sites.  I am going to have a lot of fun with those.  It is amazing how much there is that can be played in a short range.
Thank you again.  Great Post!


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LeakyDuck
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Posts: 75


« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2011, 03:29:10 am »

Wow, kypfer. Those are ABC sites I had never found. Here I was feeling good because I can now play Kum Ba Yah.

Actually, smaness, the majority of folk music is written in one octave or less. the most common keys are C, G and D. Some times you have to transpose in order to get it in the range of the MO.

Here is a link to an online converter for ABC Music.
http://www.folkinfo.org/songs/abcconvert.php


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JimOfTheCorn
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Posts: 107


Total music noob


« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2011, 05:10:44 pm »

Thanks for posting this, kypfer, I had Campin's file but hadn't come across this one.

I'd also never heard of a pibgorn (well, except for the webcomic). If you follow the link to the pibgorn page the browser starts playing a sound sample. I have to say I can understand why I hadn't heard of them before...


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kypfer
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Posts: 354


« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2011, 09:17:33 pm »

Quote
I can understand why I hadn't heard of them before...
...  Tongue ... I rather like the sound, sort of like an ocarina with a head-cold.  Roll Eyes
I've actually started to make one, but I'm stumbling on getting a reed to work reliably across the full octave. I'll get there one day, then I'll do a recording of an M.O. and pibgorn duet ... that'll be a world first  Shocked


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"I'm playing all the right notesóbut not necessarily in the right order."
Harp Player
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Posts: 827


« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2011, 05:54:57 am »

I bought an instrument that was similar  to the pibgorn called a  xaphoon.  I never was able to do much with it.  I don't know if it was just me not being able to deal with the reed or if they are not that great.  Anyway it's something to think about and is worth looking at the link.


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kypfer
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Posts: 354


« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2011, 07:55:02 am »

I'm aware of the xaphoon, but it's unusual fingering put me off. I've got a Hohner chalumeau, rather like this http://www.kunath.com/product_info.php?language=en&products_id=11 that uses a Bb clarinet mouthpiece. As I could already play whistle etc., it took me just a few minutes to coax a recognisable tune out of it. For whatever reason the embouchure was no problem at all for me, so much so that a few weeks later I bought an "Albert-system" clarinet and can now play that, after a fashion. The silly thing is, the extra exercise blowing the chalumeau and clarinet has improved my flute/fife embouchure immensely  Cool


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"I'm playing all the right notesóbut not necessarily in the right order."
Scott Maness
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Posts: 292



« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2011, 01:29:26 pm »

Quote
Actually, smaness, the majority of folk music is written in one octave or less. the most common keys are C, G and D. Some times you have to transpose in order to get it in the range of the MO.

Coming from Mandolin and Fiddle I am used to having a low and high, A and B part.  It is fun to take a song that is worked out on one instrument and fit it into another.


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hoodsmom
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Posts: 122


« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2018, 02:12:59 pm »

The original link is dead, but fortunately the page was indexed by the Internet Archive

https://web.archive.org/web/20120219091614/http://www.mochpryderi.com/Tose.html


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kypfer
Sr. Member
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Posts: 354


« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2018, 06:23:39 pm »

The original link is dead, but fortunately the page was indexed by the Internet Archive

https://web.archive.org/web/20120219091614/http://www.mochpryderi.com/Tose.html

The original link may be dead, but the updated page, as a pdf file, is here http://www.mochpryderi.com/Resources/Tose%20200%20Tunes.pdf

There's a lot of my favourite tunes in this collection Smiley


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"I'm playing all the right notesóbut not necessarily in the right order."
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