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Author Topic: C versus G  (Read 8882 times)
rbentrdr
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Posts: 8



« on: February 09, 2012, 01:42:39 am »

I have a C MO and, until I read some of the posts on here, thought the only difference between it and the G is that it has a B note on the G ocarina.  I was going by the fingerings offered for download for each ocarina. Can you guys that play both the C and G tell me about them?  I went with the C because I have a lot of C music because I'm a flute player. I have to admit, the fingerings of the C are remarkably like the flute, so it was pretty easy to learn. How much am I missing by not having the G ocarina?  Thanks.


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Jaded The Dragon
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Posts: 47



« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2012, 03:14:27 am »

Nice! Great minds think alike, you asked my question almost word for word, and i just recieved my warmstone today as well... you mustve gotten the green c, i got the sky marble looking one that was at the very bottom, anyway happy playin'.


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"Nothingness Reveals Everything, Lose Everything Without And Gain Everything Within." - Jaded The Dragon -
Dan Hazy
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« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2012, 03:29:23 am »

In my opinion,

The G is easier, better looking, can make the lowest note without having to make a big breath adjustment, but the highest note on the MO G, some people find to shrill.


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Dan Hazy
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« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2012, 05:27:40 am »

I have the G&C polly and C warmstone.  I prefer the sound of the C to my ears the G is a bit on the shrill side. With that said it is a bit easier to play the lower notes and it takes a little less breath to play. Both of those are great reasons for some people to prefer the G.

If you play the G like a C then it transposes the songs up by one position on the circle of fifths which can be handy.   The main reason I am keeping the G is I want to learn to play it like a G instrument in order to be able to play songs that will be out of range for the C.   Who knows I may even get a warmstone in the key of G one day.


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cerescop
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« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2012, 06:27:07 am »

I got the one at the top the white, blue and rust colored one. It wont be here till tomorrow. Wife ordered it for me while I was on the road. Was supposed to be here today but didn't get here.  Still waiting.....


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4efs
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« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2012, 08:24:54 pm »


Here's my thoughts on my experience so far.
 I started out with the G for a number of reasons, and played that one for about 2 1/2 months before I got my C.
Now I've had my C for about a month and a half.  I have one of each in both poly and warmstone.

I find that my Husband, Son, and Collie  prefer me to play the C. Sometimes they make faces or complain about the higher pitches.  The C requires more breath, has no "fingering" for the lowest note and is not easy to get an extra note out on the top.  I find that I like the G for some songs and the C for some songs. I play my polycarbonates more than my warmstones because I live where it is cool and wet and they behave better more often for me.  Especially my warmstone C doesn't really like the weather here and fusses about getting clear on the high notes I know this is the case because if I warm up the house a bit more or play on a warm sunny day or take the time to warm it up with a hairdryer the high notes come out much better. My warmstone G is not nearly as particular perhaps because it warms up more because it is smaller or simply because I have more hours in on the G.

I find wearing either of the Gs more comfortable.  I love the look, feel and the weight of the warmstones for sheer pleasure or when playing.  I love the small preciousness of the G and how it sings especially outside. The C does too but differently I think I just like the high notes echoing and reverberating all over outside. Anyway my vote is obviously get both, they're small!


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"The real secret of success is enthusiasm." -Walter Chrysler
MBalance
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Posts: 8


« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2012, 11:24:27 pm »

I like the look and feel of the G but prefer the mellow sound of the C. The C is harder to play to begin with but it's easier to listen to for long periods of time so the difficulty level is nullified quickly. You might have problems with the low notes being airy or squeaky for the first week or two but after that you'll get used to it. If it's too airy, you're not blowing hard enough. If it squeaks, you're blowing too hard. Find the sweet spot and practice doing notes for about 5 seconds.

Play notes- hold 5 secs, next note 5 secs, next note 5 secs, repeat for a few repetitions and you'll have them sounding sweetly in no time.

I just got a warmstone G and it sounds much better to me than my poly G but it's still the same high pitch, I can practice it with my musician earplugs in for long periods of time or just a short time without. I still prefer my C  most of the time Tongue


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Scott Maness
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« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2012, 09:46:14 pm »

In my view, it depends on the surroundings as to which sounds better.  I find the C to be more pleasurable to play in the confines of my room where the G will give me a headache at times.  (Clarification - Among other things I drive a School Bus with multiple screaming kids each day, and when I get home all that I desire is some peace and quiet for a little while.    Grin )

Where the G Ocarina is truly amazing, is when you are playing in a larger room with other people, outside or in a noisier environment.  The G as well as the C cuts very well through the noise and rides on top of the sound.

I think the difference is similar to my Violin and Viola.  On my violin it is better for cutting through the crowd and bringing a clear melody.  When I am playing the Violin I find it easier to hear myself playing and produce clear double stops (2 notes on separate strings played together) that I can hear even with multiple instruments playing.  On the Viola, which I generally prefer playing, I find that I can hear everyone else playing easier since it is a lower pitch and the resonance of the instrument is bigger and lower.  It is also easier to blend into the music and disappear into the sound.   

I also prefer a classical guitar to a steel string guitar for the same reason.  I like the warm, full, round tones that I get over a harsher sound even though I lose out in volume.

The C Ocarina sounds amazing on an empty School Bus early in the morning while waiting for time to leave.  Smiley


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cerescop
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Posts: 345



« Reply #8 on: March 14, 2012, 12:35:48 am »

I preferred the C  from day one. I haven't invested in a G for that reason. I have some hearing loss from years on the firing range and "blowing things up" for fun.  I can support what 4efs said about the warm-stone  C not liking the cold. It seems to want to hold the cold in itself. It will cause your breath to condense in the wind-way and really mess with your high and low notes. The high notes will sound off if they come out at all. I find the mouth piece area also harder to use that the C poly. It is shaped differently and I find myself blocking the wind-way sometimes making operator errors. But I like the heft and feel of the warm-stone. So I am training myself to use it. I find the elusive high F easier on the warm-stone than the poly C. I don't know why. It just is easier and more consistent with the warm-stone than  the poly C. Both do the fipple bend equally well. This is more to the materials used than a C G comparison but there it is.


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Prairie Wolf
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WWW
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2012, 10:24:56 pm »

Hi I answered this in a poll question, but if it is okay, I'll repost most the pertinent parts of my answer here, as well.

I love the compactness and extra hole on the G! It takes less breath and is easier to do ornamentations. With the G it is easier for me to get the lower and higher notes not listed on the fingering chart. That said...

I love the tone and key of the C. When comparing it to other brands of ocarinas, it has a sweet throaty sound to it, a lush vibrance.

Both the G and the C, for me, are wonderful for Celtic music and the unique sound of them is appealing. Their design, being inline, the fingering, the size I much prefer to the sweet potato. Try wearing the standard Alto or Tenor ceramic ocarina around your neck like you do the Mountain Ocarinas - there is a vast difference. Even when comparing the plastic versions of the sweet potatoes or other ceramic Alto and Tenor ocarinas.  And, there is the rugged sturdiness of the mountain ocarinas - again - you can't beat that and the warmstones and hardwood models are gorgeous, to boot!


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"The spirit of the Earth in the notes of the flute
the song speaks for my soul, when my voice is mute." -- kap
Pat Anderson
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Posts: 244


« Reply #10 on: October 04, 2012, 02:37:32 pm »

Coming late to this thread, but have posted about the same topic in other threads.  I notice a reference to a "real" G fingering chart, is there one available for download? Can somebody post a link?


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Harp Player
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« Reply #11 on: October 04, 2012, 10:07:18 pm »

The card that came with the G MO has the real fingerings in parenthesis it would look something like this  C (G) on the card.


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kypfer
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Posts: 355


« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2012, 06:43:37 am »

The available chart shows the "G" notes in parentheses but the notes on the stave are still those for the "C" instrument. I'm thinking one could probably do a "cut and paste" job, using the ocarina images from the downloadable gif here http://www.mountainsocarina.com/b/faq/fingering/ for the actual fingerings and some ABC code to generate the "real" notes on the stave. For example :

X:1
T:G Mountain Ocarina
K:G
"F#"F "G"G "A"A "B"B "C"c "D"d "E"e "F#"f "G"g "A"a


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"I'm playing all the right notes—but not necessarily in the right order."
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