Our guarantees Forum - Discussion Board Ocarina Lessons about us about our ocarinas ocarina video ocarina sound samples ocarinas and music Home Page
July 21, 2019, 09:12:43 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Join Karl in The 5-Minute Musician's Club™.
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: [1]
  Print  
Author Topic: Problem reading tabs?  (Read 7780 times)
angiessa
Full Member
***
Posts: 114



« on: April 01, 2012, 08:44:54 pm »

Does anyone else have this problem? I think it's because I learned sheet music at a young age. I have to have the sheet music layout, showing me the length of notes, in order to play anything. I've tried tabs, even with songs I know, and I just can't make heads or tails of them.  Undecided


Logged

---
Read more about my adventures in music at the Wandering Zebra.
Harp Player
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 836


« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2012, 06:15:52 am »

I played from harmonica tabs for years,  but they always had the words with them so it wasn't that hard to get the timing,  I have never tried any ocarina tabs.


Logged
kypfer
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 355


« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2012, 06:31:55 am »

Quote
I have to have the sheet music layout, showing me the length of notes, in order to play anything.
... I agree entirely (and have spouted at length on this subject elsewhere on this board  Wink
"Tabs" may be just about acceptable for introducing a very young child to an instrument, demonstrating exactly what needs to be done to achieve the desired result, i.e. put your fingers here and you'll play a "fah" (or whatever). OK for "Twinkle twinkle..." or "Three Blind Mice", when the tune is relatively easy and well known, but for an unknown, more complicated or unfamiliar piece "tabs" really are more trouble than they are worth!
Take a little time, learn the "dots on lines" and you'll have a virtually unlimited source of music available to you  Cool


Logged

"I'm playing all the right notes—but not necessarily in the right order."
angiessa
Full Member
***
Posts: 114



« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2012, 12:51:51 pm »

Glad I'm not the only one! I could turn the tabs upside-down and come up with about the same result. Wink


Logged

---
Read more about my adventures in music at the Wandering Zebra.
HawkeyeMcFly
Full Member
***
Posts: 104



WWW
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2012, 05:39:23 am »

Does anyone else have this problem? I think it's because I learned sheet music at a young age. I have to have the sheet music layout, showing me the length of notes, in order to play anything. I've tried tabs, even with songs I know, and I just can't make heads or tails of them.  Undecided

Be glad, be very very glad you can do this  Smiley
I'm learning to read notes right now at the age of app. 40. Although it works out most of the times, sometimes I'm happy to have tabs below the notes to help and support me learning difficult passages (e.g. when there are several #'s and b's).
At my current state, playing a completely unknown piece to just notes is futile, so I learn to play by notes the pieces I already know.

PS.: Knowing tabs helps to de-evolve music from videos, too (look at the fingers and write down the note).


Logged

### Always remember the wise words of One-Arm McGinty: Never ever throw water balloons at people carrying chainsaws ###
kypfer
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 355


« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2012, 06:47:56 am »

Quote
I'm learning to read notes right now at the age of app. 40.
... I was 60+ when I took it up, about 18 months ago. After about 12 weeks I could read sufficiently well to play a tune, within the range of a Mountain Ocarina (ie an octave and a bit), with little trouble ... not playing it well, admittedly, that dexterity does take time, but well enough to be able to move between a small selection of written tunes, for practice purposes, so's I didn't get "bogged down" trying to master just one piece (and getting bored with it!). I now find I can pick on mostly any of the tunes in Jack Campin's 9-note Tunebook or John Tose's Pibgorn Tunebook and make a recogniseable attempt at it within a few passes  Cool


Logged

"I'm playing all the right notes—but not necessarily in the right order."
HawkeyeMcFly
Full Member
***
Posts: 104



WWW
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2012, 07:31:12 am »

Quote
I'm learning to read notes right now at the age of app. 40.
... I was 60+ when I took it up, about 18 months ago. After about 12 weeks I could read sufficiently well to play a tune, within the range of a Mountain Ocarina (ie an octave and a bit), with little trouble ... not playing it well, admittedly, that dexterity does take time, but well enough to be able to move between a small selection of written tunes, for practice purposes, so's I didn't get "bogged down" trying to master just one piece (and getting bored with it!). I now find I can pick on mostly any of the tunes in Jack Campin's 9-note Tunebook or John Tose's Pibgorn Tunebook and make a recogniseable attempt at it within a few passes  Cool

Whoa, I'm glad there still seems to be hope for me. Cheesy

In my opinion, there are three types of people for any given activity: some got it by birth/in their blood, some may work for it and some will never make it.
As I'm definetly not in the first group for sheet reading Wink I hoped to be in the second. Grin

When I get a sheet, I first make a working copy where I then identify the tones, sometimes writing down some notes. Then I go and read the tones in a line, then I go for a first try with the unchanged original. For "Pippi Longstocking" that worked quite well for me, as there are no accidents in it Wink . Took me app 30 minutes for a good an acceptable result.


Logged

### Always remember the wise words of One-Arm McGinty: Never ever throw water balloons at people carrying chainsaws ###
kypfer
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 355


« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2012, 08:23:16 am »

Quote
In my opinion, there are three types of people for any given activity: some got it by birth/in their blood, some may work for it and some will never make it.
... I'm of the opinion that anyone who really wants to can learn most things, physical disabilities obviously not withstanding.

Thanks for the "heads up" on "Pippi Longstocking" ... a fun little tune I was unaware of  Cool


Logged

"I'm playing all the right notes—but not necessarily in the right order."
HawkeyeMcFly
Full Member
***
Posts: 104



WWW
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2012, 09:36:25 am »

Quote
In my opinion, there are three types of people for any given activity: some got it by birth/in their blood, some may work for it and some will never make it.
... I'm of the opinion that anyone who really wants to can learn most things, physical disabilities obviously not withstanding.

Actually the "really want to" seems to be the biggest factor for the third group (or better, the absence of it), although I met some individuals that I had to train in software development who really gave their best but didn't succeed. Sometimes it was heartbreaking to see an adult almost cry because he could not grasp the matter that would save his job. Cry

...and in my experience, physical disability is the main factor for people to go for activities noone would ever consider they could participate in, if not master it. Think about the Paralympics, this is the best example you can ever think of.


Logged

### Always remember the wise words of One-Arm McGinty: Never ever throw water balloons at people carrying chainsaws ###
kypfer
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 355


« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2012, 01:50:37 pm »

Quote
because he could not grasp the matter ...
grasping esoteric concepts is something that frustrates me, on occaision. At school, when TV was still in black-&-white, I was quite competent at arithmetic, algebra etc., some might say embarrasingly so, but I came up against a blank wall when we got to advanced trig and calculus ... just couldn't see the need for it, couldn't get my head around it  Huh

I've nothing but admiration for the Paralympians - some of those guys and girls REALLY want to do it  Cool


Logged

"I'm playing all the right notes—but not necessarily in the right order."
HawkeyeMcFly
Full Member
***
Posts: 104



WWW
« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2012, 08:21:49 pm »

I still remember my prof telling us "For the last 13 years you were just calculating. Now let us start with real math" OMFG, what have we begun. I still get nighmares with vector calculations in n-dimensional rooms. Tongue This was a concept I have never understood. Calculating the forces and torsion moments in a machine/gear was easy compared to this.


Logged

### Always remember the wise words of One-Arm McGinty: Never ever throw water balloons at people carrying chainsaws ###
BettingBoy
Active Newbie
*
Posts: 6



« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2012, 09:11:50 pm »

I'm totally with the same problem. I can read tabs, yeah, but only really familiar songs sound anything like right if I read tabs. I used to play piano so I can read sheet music. My memory for melodies is actually really poor, and I can barely remember how to play five songs without sheet music in front of me (even with all the playing I have done), so I need the sheets to show me the melody.
I usually turn the tabs to sheet music myself (successfully or not). But well, it's better than nothing  Cheesy


Logged
JaminStone
Active Newbie
*
Posts: 26



« Reply #12 on: February 20, 2013, 11:57:27 am »

I´m a totaöl music-noob, i admit that some zelda tunes i`m capable using sheet music and before that it was only possible by using tabs. Now i´m getting further drawn away from it and i can´t even play tunes i know if i use tabs... maybe thats agood thing but i really liked tha tabs, they made it easier for me to get what i should do. with notes i have always to count if a note is fa away from the f how many fingers i must lift or shut on the holes... guess thats the thing with being anoob, but i´ll keep on practising.

I still remember my prof telling us "For the last 13 years you were just calculating. Now let us start with real math" OMFG, what have we begun. I still get nighmares with vector calculations in n-dimensional rooms.
that sounds really familiar but in opposite to you this is my day for the next3 years...(studiying biotechnology i´d never have guessed i need that much math and physics...)


Logged

Croup and Vandemar, the Old Firm, obstacles obliterated, nuisances eradicated, bothersome limbs removed and tutelary dentistry undertaken.
Treblemaker
Full Member
***
Posts: 248


Student of the Ocarina


« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2013, 04:40:54 am »

I'm totally with the same problem. I can read tabs, yeah, but only really familiar songs sound anything like right if I read tabs. I used to play piano so I can read sheet music. My memory for melodies is actually really poor, and I can barely remember how to play five songs without sheet music in front of me (even with all the playing I have done), so I need the sheets to show me the melody.
I usually turn the tabs to sheet music myself (successfully or not). But well, it's better than nothing  Cheesy

I highly recommend getting Karl's learn to play the Ocarina book with the CD's. It's an excellent way to learn how to play the Ocarina and read Ocarina music.  Smiley 


Logged
Pages: [1]
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.7 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!