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Author Topic: Playing my Hardwood C and Singing at the Pier  (Read 10993 times)
Treblemaker
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« on: November 16, 2012, 04:33:15 am »

Hey everyone,
Since I live in Southern Calif I sing and play with a band every Thursday night at the Newport Beach Pier. It's a lot of fun, we bring coffee and cookies for who ever wants them, and we sing and play Christian music- all different types. We've met a lot of people from all different countries, and we're on a first name bases with the homeless folk that live there.
Tonight we played in the rain. It's so nice to play an instrument that's so beautiful and impervious to weather. We finally had to pack up because the guitars and the cajon were getting too wet. No keyboards tonight, also the banjo, sax, bagpipe and flute didn't show up either- can't say I blame them!  Roll Eyes
This would be such a cool place for an "Ocarina Happening". I don't know anyone else who plays the Ocarina- Southern Calif is behind the musical times!


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Prairie Wolf
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« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2012, 06:05:47 am »

You have told a wonderful story in your one post. I could picture it all in my mind, so well, through your description. There are a good number of people who have been given a gift by your presence, your music, your sharing, your witnessing, and your friendliness. What a blessing you are to many. Wish I could join you, but I live in central CA and rarely go south, except on the rare occasion to go Disneyland.


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"The spirit of the Earth in the notes of the flute
the song speaks for my soul, when my voice is mute." -- kap
Harp Player
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« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2012, 07:34:29 am »

I am glad to read that you are playing in public like that.  And I like your choice of music even better.  I used to play my harmonicas in nursing homes a few years ago and miss it. So enjoy your time sharing your music with friends and anyone that happens to walk by.

I have been saying for years that music is a gift that is best shared.


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HawkeyeMcFly
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2012, 09:25:38 am »

It is good to know there are still people out there that care for others, especially for those who had bad luck in life.
If everyone tries to make the world a better place, it might become one. Keep it going Smiley


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### Always remember the wise words of One-Arm McGinty: Never ever throw water balloons at people carrying chainsaws ###
Treblemaker
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Student of the Ocarina


« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2012, 05:14:27 am »

You have told a wonderful story in your one post. I could picture it all in my mind, so well, through your description. There are a good number of people who have been given a gift by your presence, your music, your sharing, your witnessing, and your friendliness. What a blessing you are to many. Wish I could join you, but I live in central CA and rarely go south, except on the rare occasion to go Disneyland.

What a nice thing to say, Prairie Wolf, we have a wonderful time- wish you could join us!!!


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Treblemaker
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Student of the Ocarina


« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2012, 05:23:43 am »

I am glad to read that you are playing in public like that.  And I like your choice of music even better.  I used to play my harmonicas in nursing homes a few years ago and miss it. So enjoy your time sharing your music with friends and anyone that happens to walk by.

I have been saying for years that music is a gift that is best shared.

Thanks, Harp Player, up until last Thursday I was a bundle of nerves every time I played a solo, I am relaxed when I sing, but it took me longer with the Ocarina, the other night was the first time I was relaxed playing with the band. Praise God, I think I have crossed over my fear threshold. ( we'll see next week) LOL  Roll Eyes


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Treblemaker
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« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2012, 05:36:15 am »

It is good to know there are still people out there that care for others, especially for those who had bad luck in life.
If everyone tries to make the world a better place, it might become one. Keep it going Smiley

We will, HawkeyeMcFly,
I've also been blessed to sing and play at Assisted Living places. I'm doing O come O come Emanuel on my C Hardwood, we found a track in the right key.  I sing duet with a friend using background tracks, I'm a 1st Soprano and my friend is a 2nd Soprano. We're singing at 3 places this Dec, it's fun to combine the Ocarina with our duet.


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Pat Anderson
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« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2012, 01:55:46 pm »

I too just have a great picture in my mind from your description!  Awesome!


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Harp Player
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« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2012, 07:13:49 pm »

The fear threshold don't just go away instantly you have to keep chipping away at it every time you play.  The fear does fade as you get more experience, an more confident with your instrument.  I can confidently join in on a song I have never even heard before with my harmonicas, but my knees turn to jello and my mouth goes dry playing a song on the MO even when I have practiced it many times.  The difference is many years of experience with the harmonica and only playing in public a few times on the MO.  So keep chipping away at the fear thing by playing in public.  If you do that the fear will keep getting smaller till you don't even notice it anymore.


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Prairie Wolf
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« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2012, 07:59:57 pm »

Harp Player - your words are filled with wisdom. I really am performance-tied (the equivalent of tongue-tied, only when playing an instrument) and I haven't been able to even put my face in my You Tube videos. Only recently have I been able to put any part of my body, and then only so folks could see the fingering on what I was playing in case they wanted to try to play along. As to playing for others, in real life, I get so flustered - I get a bright red rash on my neck and chest, my head will sometimes start shaking, my mind will do a total mind-blank, my hands will fail me, and my breathing gets so bad I feel like I need to use my asthma inhaler just to get a good breath. I so envy folks who can perform for others. Granted, I can play a song for one or two or three people and not butcher it too bad - and that is an accomplishment for me, but as I become more confident, it gets a little easier.

Hearing about how other forum folks, like Treblemaker, can perform for others in public and have worked hard to overcome their fears and difficulties - it gives me hope that I, too, can get to that point!


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"The spirit of the Earth in the notes of the flute
the song speaks for my soul, when my voice is mute." -- kap
Harp Player
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« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2012, 09:03:07 pm »

Quote
, I can play a song for one or two or three people and not butcher it too bad - and that is an accomplishment for me,

That is a great start. it is actually not much harder to play for a large group than just a few.  Just keep exposing yourself to playing for others, even if it is just a few at a time.  I started by torturing my wife with the harmonica, and gradually added to it.  Back in those days I did a lot of camping and I would often practice in the campground.  Even thous I wasn't 'preforming' I was playing where other people could hear me and that did a lot to help settle the nerves.

Another thing that has a large impact on me was a CD that I heard of concert pianist. I don't remember his first name but i think the last name was Brinkman.  Anyway i was listening to the beautiful music and right in the middle of one of his numbers he had a glaring break in the timing.  I don't now why that wasn't edited out but it was one of the things that helped me to get over myself.  After all if a professional  concert piano player would let something like that go on his studio recorded CD then I didn't have to worry about being perfect playing live. That was one of my breakthrough moments in playing in public.

Another thing you need to remember is that the music you buy has been edited, cleaned, processed, and recorded many times to get it just right.


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Prairie Wolf
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« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2012, 09:14:59 pm »

Quote
Back in those days I did a lot of camping and I would often practice in the campground.

Aha, I have played while camping, too! I would either go to the bathroom with my ocarina or flutes and play when no one else was in there, or play inside my tent or behind the canopy we put up that has tarp sides three sides to it. Or, I have played after the sun goes down and I'm sitting by the fire and no one can see me. That has helped me to come out of my shell. Once, a young man came over from another campground to investigate where the sound was coming from. I thought he was surely there to complain about the racket, but he said he really liked my playing and thought I was playing a recording. He requested that I not stop playing as he and his wife were really enjoying it. I was shocked!


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"The spirit of the Earth in the notes of the flute
the song speaks for my soul, when my voice is mute." -- kap
Treblemaker
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Student of the Ocarina


« Reply #12 on: November 19, 2012, 06:46:36 am »

I too just have a great picture in my mind from your description!  Awesome!

Thanks, Pat! Cheesy


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Treblemaker
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Student of the Ocarina


« Reply #13 on: November 19, 2012, 06:53:30 am »

The fear threshold don't just go away instantly you have to keep chipping away at it every time you play.  The fear does fade as you get more experience, an more confident with your instrument.  I can confidently join in on a song I have never even heard before with my harmonicas, but my knees turn to jello and my mouth goes dry playing a song on the MO even when I have practiced it many times.  The difference is many years of experience with the harmonica and only playing in public a few times on the MO.  So keep chipping away at the fear thing by playing in public.  If you do that the fear will keep getting smaller till you don't even notice it anymore.

You are so correct. When I sing, I am just fine. But I still don't have the sound quality I want on the MO- that's going to take much more practice. One day I hope I have my own sound on the MO- like Karl and Ubizmo. But I haven't got an even vibrato down yet and my breath control really needs a lot of work... SIGH   Roll Eyes


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Treblemaker
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Student of the Ocarina


« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2012, 07:02:12 am »

Hearing about how other forum folks, like Treblemaker, can perform for others in public and have worked hard to overcome their fears and difficulties - it gives me hope that I, too, can get to that point!
You will too Prairie Wolf, I've never even posted anything on YouTube yet, because I'm too critical of how I sound  Roll Eyes  It is very difficult to be a frustrated perfectionist  Roll Eyes  in fact, it's crippling! To be constantly critiquing yourself while you are playing blocks you from really getting into the music and feeling it. I wish I could shut that part of myself down.


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