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Author Topic: Something to talk about...the "ProRange"  (Read 47664 times)
Karl
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 405


Coda player


« Reply #285 on: July 15, 2017, 02:21:12 pm »

I hear you guys about the sound samples. Let's see, it is now Saturday, 7/15/17.  Since we now have quality molded parts (even though there are still aspects to finish up), I hereby commit to posting a series of sound samples on or before next Saturday. Tick, tock, tick, tock...

I thought about waiting on the sound samples until I could post videos. That way I could show you Coda's updated look, but it will be a little while yet before we have those instruments to show.


« Last Edit: July 15, 2017, 03:42:03 pm by Karl » Logged
d102
Active Newbie
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Posts: 36


« Reply #286 on: July 15, 2017, 03:20:58 pm »

That's a very kind offer, considering everything else you must be committed to at the moment.    Look forward to hearing them, possibly even some new pictures as well ?
Have a  not too pressured week.  Smiley


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Sinocelt
Active Newbie
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Posts: 14


« Reply #287 on: July 16, 2017, 04:48:05 pm »

Since we now have quality molded parts (even though there are still aspects to finish up), I hereby commit to posting a series of sound samples

Kind ...

on or before next Saturday. Tick, tock, tick, tock...

... and cruel.


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Calculus
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 61


421.221.42


« Reply #288 on: July 17, 2017, 10:26:48 pm »

Yay! Sound samples coming soon!

I hope there is a non-colored logo black version, and I agree that the logo would be hard to see from a distance regardless.

I need to start notating my compositions; I have a medley that I've been too lazy to notate and a couple of tunes suitable for the coda that are likewise not notated.


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windjammer
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 54


« Reply #289 on: July 18, 2017, 03:49:32 am »

 Yay!!!  I'm ready for some video and audio candy.  Also I'm ready to start studying the  manual  so I can hit the ground running when I get the ocarina.


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d102
Active Newbie
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Posts: 36


« Reply #290 on: July 18, 2017, 09:18:50 am »

Yay!!!  I'm ready for some video and audio candy.  Also I'm ready to start studying the  manual  so I can hit the ground running when I get the ocarina.


Have I missed the manual somehow or was this just a wish for it to be put up on the website?


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windjammer
Jr. Member
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Posts: 54


« Reply #291 on: July 18, 2017, 02:04:23 pm »

Just a wish and planted idea.


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windjammer
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 54


« Reply #292 on: July 18, 2017, 03:12:57 pm »

The first ocarinas I ever bought was Mountain Ocarinas.  Then last year I bought a transverse triple ocarina.
 Which most people don't recommend you start out on  but I have had no trouble learning on. But it took a while to get used to the position on my wrist especially my left wrist. That is another thing I like about in-line ocarinas.  The other problem I have with the plastic transverse triple is condensation in the fipple  affecting the sound sometimes and I have to blow it out. Weather  conditions can  affect that a lot.  I think one reason that  it affects this particular instrument  so much is the Windway is rather skinny  and the material is non-porous.
But  for the most part I've really enjoyed playing it.  So I've been waiting for this  two octave  Mountain ocarina for a very long time almost 10 years  and I want to hit the ground running  to make up for lost time.


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Karl
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 405


Coda player


« Reply #293 on: July 18, 2017, 03:52:02 pm »

Hi, Windjammer, correct me if I'm wrong. By manual, I think you are referring to the Coda book.  Here is a short description. Forgive any repetition from earlier posts, which I provide to be helpful.

The Coda book is on heavy-weight quality paper and has fifty-one 8.5" x 11" pages.  It has two pages of tips, the fingering charts, and 68 songs, which are presented following a certain method. With the exception of the first two songs (the ubiquitous Hot Cross Buns and Mary Had a Little Lamb), all were chosen for their beauty as well as for teaching purposes. As most of you know, Coda is essentially a two-octave chromatic instrument: C5 to C7. (However, using a special technique that you may or may not embrace, you can easily play B4, and, in certain contexts, even Bb4 or A4.) Something that makes Coda intuitive to play is that the C major scale can be fingered exactly the same for the upper and lower octaves. (I say, can be because there are four overlapping notes --middle B, C, C#, and D-- which make it much easier to play challenging pieces.) The Coda book begins by presenting a number of easier songs that you first play in just the lower octave. Then, using exactly the same fingerings, you play the songs in the upper octave.  Gradually, the book moves you into playing both octaves together. It also provides some scale practice and gradual introduction of all the sharps and flats. For extra practice and challenge, many songs are presented in two, three, or even four keys. Finally, the bulk of the book is filled with beautiful music intended to provide you with a nice starting repertoire, many hours of enjoyment, and lots of songs to practice to get you used to Coda's two-octave tonal range.

The Coda book was important to me because I wanted to help you master your new instrument more systematically and quickly. If you love the music I've provided, you'll have plenty to practice for a long time. If not, the book is a coherent way to get your feet wet before you move on to music more in keeping with your own tastes and interests.

Alas, since the Coda book provides guided practice playing Coda instead reading about Coda, having the book ahead of time wouldn't be of any help. To address challenges or questions about playing coda, I plan to make lots of short, helpful videos with tips and suggested techniques. I've asked Ubizmo, and he has offered to make videos also.

Finally, the Coda book will only be helpful to those who already read music to some extent. To help raw beginners, I hope to provide a free video adaptation of our Learning to Play curriculum, expanding its scope to include Coda's wider range.  


« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 04:00:20 pm by Karl » Logged
Calculus
Jr. Member
**
Posts: 61


421.221.42


« Reply #294 on: July 18, 2017, 05:06:52 pm »

Thanks for the update!

Is it possible to fipple bend both chambers at once and in tune with each other, like playing B4 and B5 at the same time? If so, what about B flat and A?


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Karl
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 405


Coda player


« Reply #295 on: July 18, 2017, 06:12:44 pm »

Calculus, what you have described is not possible on Coda. Shading the window (or voicing) with your lower lip to obtain extra low notes only works on Coda's lower chamber. 


« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 06:17:52 pm by Karl » Logged
d102
Active Newbie
*
Posts: 36


« Reply #296 on: July 18, 2017, 07:15:07 pm »

Hi, Windjammer, correct me if I'm wrong. By manual, I think you are referring to the Coda book.  Here is a short description. Forgive any repetition from earlier posts, which I provide to be helpful.

The Coda book is on heavy-weight quality paper and has fifty-one 8.5" x 11" pages.  It has two pages of tips, the fingering charts, and 68 songs, which are presented following a certain method. With the exception of the first two songs (the ubiquitous Hot Cross Buns and Mary Had a Little Lamb), all were chosen for their beauty as well as for teaching purposes. As most of you know, Coda is essentially a two-octave chromatic instrument: C5 to C7. (However, using a special technique that you may or may not embrace, you can easily play B4, and, in certain contexts, even Bb4 or A4.) Something that makes Coda intuitive to play is that the C major scale can be fingered exactly the same for the upper and lower octaves. (I say, can be because there are four overlapping notes --middle B, C, C#, and D-- which make it much easier to play challenging pieces.) The Coda book begins by presenting a number of easier songs that you first play in just the lower octave. Then, using exactly the same fingerings, you play the songs in the upper octave.  Gradually, the book moves you into playing both octaves together. It also provides some scale practice and gradual introduction of all the sharps and flats. For extra practice and challenge, many songs are presented in two, three, or even four keys. Finally, the bulk of the book is filled with beautiful music intended to provide you with a nice starting repertoire, many hours of enjoyment, and lots of songs to practice to get you used to Coda's two-octave tonal range.

The Coda book was important to me because I wanted to help you master your new instrument more systematically and quickly. If you love the music I've provided, you'll have plenty to practice for a long time. If not, the book is a coherent way to get your feet wet before you move on to music more in keeping with your own tastes and interests.

Alas, since the Coda book provides guided practice playing Coda instead reading about Coda, having the book ahead of time wouldn't be of any help. To address challenges or questions about playing coda, I plan to make lots of short, helpful videos with tips and suggested techniques. I've asked Ubizmo, and he has offered to make videos also.

Finally, the Coda book will only be helpful to those who already read music to some extent. To help raw beginners, I hope to provide a free video adaptation of our Learning to Play curriculum, expanding its scope to include Coda's wider range.  

That sounds brilliant, but for those of us not in the USA and subject to expensive, slow delivery and customs charges, could you consider also making it available for download?     Might you also like to give us an idea on the price?


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Karl
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 405


Coda player


« Reply #297 on: July 18, 2017, 08:04:27 pm »

Quote
That sounds brilliant, but for those of us not in the USA and subject to expensive, slow delivery and customs charges, could you consider also making it available for download?     Might you also like to give us an idea on the price?
 
Good question. My original plan was to include the book with Coda at no cost because I believe it's in the customer's best interest to have the book, and most people would forgo it if they had to pay for it.  Also, I find an actual music book, one that I can hold in my hands, to be more useful than a downloadable PDF.

But then we decided to lower the cost for Coda--by a lot. Is it still viable to include the book for free? I think so, but I'm not 100 percent sure because some of our costs are still tentative. At the very least, we'll include access to a downloadable PDF with Coda, and we'll make the hard copy version available at a very reasonable cost. With that said, our plan is still to include a hard copy of the book at no cost, but I'm obviously hedging a bit to avoid misleading anyone in case we have to change our minds.

Now, Susan (my beloved wife and shipping manager) says that the book's weight will not affect international shipping costs because Coda only weighs 2.5 ounces, and the book only weighs 5.3 ounces. Also, we have been researching shipping alternatives for international packages in hopes to make it cheaper.



« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 08:13:26 pm by Karl » Logged
Sinocelt
Active Newbie
*
Posts: 14


« Reply #298 on: July 18, 2017, 08:43:37 pm »

When it comes to shipping, size tends to matter more than weight. I sometimes wonder if you have to ship bricks for the real weight to matter; most often, you have to pay for an "equivalent weight" based on package size, and then you learn that your 100-g package's "equivalent weight" is 500 g or more.  Roll Eyes


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d102
Active Newbie
*
Posts: 36


« Reply #299 on: July 18, 2017, 09:07:19 pm »

If you can manage to include the book (even at the expense of raising the purchase price of the Coda a little) and provide access to a PDF file for when I cannot find the book or am away from home that would be perfect in my opinion.  I wish your beloved the very best of luck unravelling the complexities of international shipping.


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