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Author Topic: Something to talk about...the "ProRange"  (Read 109637 times)
ubizmo
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« Reply #405 on: October 28, 2017, 05:56:19 pm »

I find myself more mystically drawn to the dark blue, through which light dimly shows, for some reason. All things considered, I suspect the monochrome Coda will look more distinguished, but I do wonder whether having a different color as a layer, rather than just the mouthpiece, might look cool. This sort of thing worked pretty well with the Warmstone MOs, after all.

It will be important to have cards printed up. I can already attest that people will not recognize Coda as a musical instrument but they will be very interested after they hear it.


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Karl
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« Reply #406 on: October 28, 2017, 06:17:48 pm »

Ubizmo, here is what I'll do. I'll send you unassembled blue, brown, and black sets, which you can assemble, mix, match, and evaluate. As always, I welcome your sage advice. Note: the four Coda components fit together beautifully without gluing or ultrasonic welding, but the instruments look slightly different than they will when welded because the raised energy directors cause little gaps at the joints.

Now, to the rest of you, my children, please know that I love you all equally. Don't feel jealous of Ubi. I'd send you all samples if I could! Wink

By the way, just to give you an idea of how personal color choices can be, I've polled some people in the last few days. Yesterday, the balance was tilted toward solid colors. Today, toward color combinations. And since what we perceive as color is reflected light, lighting conditions are a big factor.


« Last Edit: October 28, 2017, 06:42:25 pm by Karl » Logged
windjammer
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« Reply #407 on: October 28, 2017, 06:50:38 pm »

Hey Karl !!! So sorry to hear about your Mom. I lost my Mom in July. She was a awesome mother and friend that loved the LORD. She loved to help people young and old. She was well loved in the community.
So I do understand.

I’m glad to hear about the progress with CODA. Thanks for the update.


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windjammer
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« Reply #408 on: October 28, 2017, 07:04:02 pm »

I thought at first that the solid black would be my first choice but now the dark blue that lets the light come through like a dark jewel is my first choice.


« Last Edit: October 28, 2017, 07:21:42 pm by windjammer » Logged
windjammer
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« Reply #409 on: October 28, 2017, 07:43:24 pm »

I'm so sorry ,Karl. I just lost my beloved sister. It's a difficult time.

So sorry for your loss also Shar.


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windjammer
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« Reply #410 on: October 28, 2017, 08:47:58 pm »

Hey Ubizmo. Do you have any demo videos coming up?


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Jason
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« Reply #411 on: October 28, 2017, 10:06:16 pm »

So sorry to hear about your loss Sad My mother also recently passed away and was only in her 60s. No fun at all Sad

Very excited to hear about the progress with the CODA. Will definitely order the song book to go along with it and to learn to play it. Will it come with CDs like the other songbook did?


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windjammer
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« Reply #412 on: October 29, 2017, 12:09:28 am »

Sorry Jason for your loss.
Wow! Sounds like it has been a ruff time for many in this small group. Sad


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ubizmo
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« Reply #413 on: October 29, 2017, 02:04:04 pm »

Hey Ubizmo. Do you have any demo videos coming up?

Not immediately, because at the moment I only have one of the invisible Codas. I plan to resume making videos when I have a visible one. I may remake some earlier ones as well, using Coda instead of MO. There were a few tunes where I made compromises due to range limitation. But I want to do more "location" recording, without backing track. Or even with a backing track, but not recorded in this little room in my house. I think it gives people a better feeling about the instrument to see it played out in the world.

A tune that I find myself playing a lot is "Carolan's Welcome", which is in the Coda book. I'll probably begin with that.


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windjammer
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« Reply #414 on: October 29, 2017, 08:14:55 pm »

Very good !  You seem to play and record a lot of the music I like and play. So between You and Karl we should have a good sampling.




« Last Edit: October 30, 2017, 12:51:16 am by windjammer » Logged
Harp Player
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« Reply #415 on: October 30, 2017, 06:43:17 am »


It the breath requirements for the CODA close to what the breath requirement are for the MO C?

The reason I am asking is because my Ocarinas have been collecting dust for a while because of the limited range. I have got them out some the past couple of nights to get back it practice, but I was wondering if it would be better to just wait a few more weeks on the CODA?


 I plan to resume making videos when I have a visible one. I may remake some earlier ones as well, using Coda instead of MO. T


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ubizmo
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« Reply #416 on: October 30, 2017, 11:14:38 am »

The breath requirements are very similar to MOs, the C specifically. The sound produced is different though, as soon you can tell from the sound samples Karl made.


Sent from my LG-H872 using Tapatalk


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d102
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« Reply #417 on: October 30, 2017, 12:47:21 pm »

The MO "C" is my favourite but I still struggle to get the breath correct to get the low C spot on, especially when dropping from a much highter note, hoping the Coda is going to be a little easier.  Any helpful tips in the meantime would be much appreciated.


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Karl
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« Reply #418 on: October 30, 2017, 03:31:41 pm »

Hi, guys, I'm jumping in quick to answer some questions.

D102, I think you'll find that Coda's low C is nice and solid--easy to play. I understand everyone's desire for tips in advance. I would want them too! However, the reality is that I'm racing the clock to get pieces into place for the launch (which includes tips videos), so I think it makes sense to wait and present the tips in context--when you are actually holding a Coda in your own hands. Keep in mind that, outside of this small group of faithful followers, this whole Coda project is still very much under the radar.

Harp Player, I'm not sure how much getting out your old C will help you. Some things about Coda are the same as what you are used to. Thus, if you play one of our other instruments (or even if you don't), you will pick up Coda relatively quickly.

For instance, in both octaves, the fingering for the C scale on Coda is the same intuitive linear fingering pattern that you are used to. 

But, there are differences also.

One difference is that Coda has a few overlapping notes in the middle of the scale --B, C, C#, and D-- that you can play in two ways. At first, sometimes you vacillate on which fingering to choose, but with a bit of practice, the overlapping notes make challenging passages much easier to play.

Another notable difference from our previous models is that you play the D in the 2nd octave by lifting your left thumb instead of your right thumb. (Note: you can also play that 2nd octave D with the old low D fingering--whichever is easier, depending on the musical passage that you are playing.)

A few chromatic fingerings are slightly different than on our present models, but we have found that you pick up the differences quickly.  Of course, you now have a much wider range of notes, so you have to get used to reading some new musical notes if you aren't already. The Coda book (included with Coda; no CDs) is designed to get you up and running on Coda quickly and to give you plenty of beautiful music to play. We'll make lots of simple tips videos also.

You play Coda with relaxed, straighter fingers instead of highly curved fingers. (Again, we'll make short tips videos to show you all this.)

Wow! I just modified this post because I forgot the biggest difference between Coda and our previous instruments. You blow into one opening in the mouthpiece for low notes and another opening for high notes.The fact that I forgot shows how 2nd nature this has become to me, but you have to get used to it. You see, Coda has two sound chambers but just one set of toneholes and a fluid, intuitive fingering pattern. This makes it much easier play and to improvise with than double ocarinas. (Also, tiny, tough, and light, Coda is designed with EDC, or EveryDay Carry, in mind. In other words, Coda is specifically designed to make it easier to bring along wherever you go.)

Finally, I should mention a limitation of the Coda book. Unfortunately, it is only helpful to those who already read music. For those who want to learn, I plan to create free video lessons based on our Learning to Play curriculum, adapted to encompass Coda's wider range.


« Last Edit: October 30, 2017, 03:53:16 pm by Karl » Logged
withnoe
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« Reply #419 on: October 30, 2017, 03:47:36 pm »

Karl can't wait to get my hands on one.  The few minor nuances seem as if they will easily be overcome.

Thanks for the update!


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