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Author Topic: Hello from Edgewood, New Mexico, USA  (Read 3074 times)
franko
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Posts: 11


« on: November 19, 2015, 04:11:23 pm »

Hope all are doing well. It appears this is a very active forum for Ocarinas and I hope to be able to join in with questions and share experiences.  I first fell in love with the sound of these little instruments after hearing Ubizmo on youtube. This guy is just great.  I try to play the oriole recorder (c) as well as a few irish whistles (low d) but the wife keeps telling me I am tone deaf.  I told her no.......it is just the whistle sounds of a novice.  It is not as easy as it looks with a low D for sure.  I just need to practice more.  I also like  the videos I have seen by David Ramos he seems to be very talented also . Hope to gain more insight as to the use of some of the 6 hole units I have seen as well as the 10 hole units sold by Mountain.  I presume the only difference is maybe a couple more notes the 10 hole unit will be able to play.  Not sure but any advice is appreciated. Chat later.
Franko


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Harp Player
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Posts: 836


« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2015, 05:48:42 pm »

Hi Franko and welcome to the forums.

I don't know much about the fingering of the 6 hole pendant Ocarinas, but I do know that they use what is known as cross fingering which is much different from the liner fingering that the Mountain Ocarina uses. Here is a fingering chart for the 6 hole English Pendant system http://ocarinamaking.com/chartgen/display/4h/c I hope that helps you make up your mind.


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terryg
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Posts: 24


« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2015, 10:37:26 pm »

Good luck Franco, the Ocarina is fun, but challenging.   I am also new to this instrument.

You are right, this busy forum will keep you busy.  Just wait and see.  And wait.  And wait.....and.....


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terryg
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Posts: 24


« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2015, 10:40:33 pm »

Franco, do you already own a mountain ocarina?
I also share your pain with your wife.  This is a problem in my home too.  But mine tries to be nice.


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franko
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Posts: 11


« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2015, 01:47:21 pm »

Hi Franko and welcome to the forums.

I don't know much about the fingering of the 6 hole pendant Ocarinas, but I do know that they use what is known as cross fingering which is much different from the liner fingering that the Mountain Ocarina uses. Here is a fingering chart for the 6 hole English Pendant system http://ocarinamaking.com/chartgen/display/4h/c I hope that helps you make up your mind.
    Thank you so much for the info Harp Player that is interesting and the book is reference to the book is really neat.  Thank you for you kindness and trying to help me understand.  I was even looking at the long shaped ones with the mouth piece on the side and am now wondering what type of fingering they have?  I have heard the fingering on the MO is pretty straight forward which makes them much easier to play.  Would you agree?


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franko
Active Newbie
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Posts: 11


« Reply #5 on: November 20, 2015, 02:04:42 pm »

Franco, do you already own a mountain ocarina?
I also share your pain with your wife.  This is a problem in my home too.  But mine tries to be nice.
    Hello terrg,   Don't get me wrong my wife is still nice she just speaks the truth.  Ha Ha in a kidding way but is a good way to get me to practice privately before I bother her or the dogs with funny sounds out of this Low D.  To answer your question at present I do not have an inline MO whistle but am really checking them out because the sound so good and appear easy to play.  I have also been looking at the other style that is long with a has the blow hole on the side.  I guess like they played on those shows the Hobbit, Zelda etc. Not too familiar with those shows or characters or whatever but I have seen advertisements of them with the other style of ocarina.  Just not sure about the ease of playing one of those compared to the MO.  Thanks for any info.


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Harp Player
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« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2015, 07:01:52 am »

Franco, do you already own a mountain ocarina?
I also share your pain with your wife.  This is a problem in my home too.  But mine tries to be nice.
    Hello terrg,   Don't get me wrong my wife is still nice she just speaks the truth.  Ha Ha in a kidding way but is a good way to get me to practice privately before I bother her or the dogs with funny sounds out of this Low D.  To answer your question at present I do not have an inline MO whistle but am really checking them out because the sound so good and appear easy to play.  I have also been looking at the other style that is long with a has the blow hole on the side.  I guess like they played on those shows the Hobbit, Zelda etc. Not too familiar with those shows or characters or whatever but I have seen advertisements of them with the other style of ocarina.  Just not sure about the ease of playing one of those compared to the MO.  Thanks for any info.

The type of Ocarina you described (known as the sweet potato by many) is by far the more popular shape for most Ocarina players.  With that being said I think that the Mountain Ocarina is much easier on my wrists than the Sweet potato design.  I have a history of carpal tunnel problems.  The one other  non Mountain Ocarina I own was actually made by the person who owns the website I sent you to. It is a fantastic instrument with a very stable and solid bottom end, but the breath curve is pretty steep so the high notes get VERY loud.  Robert has started making his newer models with a flatter breath slope so that shouldn't be as much of an issue now.


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