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Author Topic: Transverse vs Inline Ocarina  (Read 6117 times)
franko
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« on: November 23, 2015, 09:30:00 pm »

Can someone tell me is it just easier to play an inline ocarina instead of a transverse unit?  I see people playing transverse units but have no idea how long it took them to get good.  Thanks for any info.



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Scott Maness
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« Reply #1 on: November 23, 2015, 10:27:18 pm »

I have only owned inline ocarinas.  I would like to try a transverse one someday.


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kypfer
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« Reply #2 on: November 23, 2015, 11:51:54 pm »

Transverse and inline are basically the same, just with the mouthpiece in a different position, much like comparing a whistle/recorder with a fife/flute ... learn one and you'll have a lot less problem with the other ... been there, done that  Wink

Personally, I find holding/playing an inline instrument, be it whistle/recorder or ocarina more comfortable, in the long term, than playing the side-blown flute, though in this comparison the flute does have a degree of dynamic advantage over the recorder, especially, so it can be worth the effort. I'm not so sure there's that much difference between a good-quality in-line ocarina and a good-quality transverse ocarina, so it's possibly a little more down to personal style ... each to their own Smiley


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"I'm playing all the right notes—but not necessarily in the right order."
franko
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« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2015, 05:42:01 pm »

Thanks for your input. Hopefully people that play both will jump in to the conversation.


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Harp Player
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« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2015, 05:56:27 pm »

I have talked about this a few times before on other threads.  I only have one transverse Ocarina so I am no expert, but I will have to say that the inline is much easier on my wrists.


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franko
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« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2015, 03:35:34 pm »

I have talked about this a few times before on other threads.  I only have one transverse Ocarina so I am no expert, but I will have to say that the inline is much easier on my wrists.

What brand was your transverse?  I hear some are now slanting the mouth piece to alleviate wrist pain.  I guess you were not the only one with that issue. 


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franko
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« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2015, 04:32:15 pm »

The reason I am asking these questions is that I have seen many different versions of Ocarinas.  I like the MO because it has 9 or 10  holes depending on the key and 18 different tones which I will have to check the explanation.   Some inline ocarinas I have seen only have 10 holes and some even have only 6 holes.  I figure the less holes the less tones or notes you are able to play and seeing all transverse units  are 12 holes I figure the range is somewhat more than any inline that I have seen.  As to whether the extra notes would be necessary would depend on the tune one is trying to play.  I have to do more investigation to totally understand the ins and outs of the ocarina.  Just a little strange to me at present when units with less holes than others some manufacturers state they can still get the same number of tones.  That at present confuses me.  I figure I might be able to get a little help on this forum.  Thanks for any help.  Trying to figure this out because if the inline ocarina can still give me the range of a transverse that would be good because I have always liked the sound of inline instruments as well as a good wood made instrument even though the high quality corian material by Dupont is awesome as well. Chat later.


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terryg
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« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2015, 06:14:21 pm »

Hi Franco,

I recently took delivery on a Charlie Hind wooden Ocarina, key of D Soprano.  It has 4 holes on top and two on the back.  Completely different fingering system than the MO inline.  It has a full octave +2. 

I've only had it for a few days, so I hesitate to make any pro or con comments on this forum, since this is a MO forum, and I am new to all things Ocarina.  I will say this though, and this shouldn't offend, if I had it to do all over again I would purchase it again.  Before it's all said and done, within the next 12 months I am sure my collection will grow.  It won't make me better, but it will make me happy.

I own upwards of 30, ten hole diatonic harmonicas, and probably 20 tremolos.  I can say, with just a couple of exceptions, I love um all.  Not much more than a hair breath between the different models.  I suspect this is the case with the different Ocarinas. 

I will offer this.  The Hind wooden Ocarina is plenty tough, but the Poly MO wins if you should happen to drop one from a height of say, 15 ft.

Hopefully this will help your pondering spirit. 


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franko
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« Reply #8 on: November 26, 2015, 12:55:03 am »

Hi Franco,

I recently took delivery on a Charlie Hind wooden Ocarina, key of D Soprano.  It has 4 holes on top and two on the back.  Completely different fingering system than the MO inline.  It has a full octave +2. 

I've only had it for a few days, so I hesitate to make any pro or con comments on this forum, since this is a MO forum, and I am new to all things Ocarina.  I will say this though, and this shouldn't offend, if I had it to do all over again I would purchase it again.  Before it's all said and done, within the next 12 months I am sure my collection will grow.  It won't make me better, but it will make me happy.

I own upwards of 30, ten hole diatonic harmonicas, and probably 20 tremolos.  I can say, with just a couple of exceptions, I love um all.  Not much more than a hair breath between the different models.  I suspect this is the case with the different Ocarinas. 

I will offer this.  The Hind wooden Ocarina is plenty tough, but the Poly MO wins if you should happen to drop one from a height of say, 15 ft.

Hopefully this will help your pondering spirit. 
Thank you terryg for the information. Every little info I can get from others will help and I appreciate you taking the time to reply.


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Harp Player
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« Reply #9 on: November 27, 2015, 01:32:47 am »

I have talked about this a few times before on other threads.  I only have one transverse Ocarina so I am no expert, but I will have to say that the inline is much easier on my wrists.

What brand was your transverse?  I hear some are now slanting the mouth piece to alleviate wrist pain.  I guess you were not the only one with that issue. 

The one I have is a Pure Ocarina  AD that is made  by Robert Hickman in the UK.  It has a slanted mouthpiece like most of the better and newer models.  I just have a lot of hard miles on my wrists and I am now paying the price for all of the abuse. The inline models are much easier on me for that reason.


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ubizmo
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I couldn't fail to disagree with you less.


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Re:
« Reply #10 on: November 29, 2015, 07:55:52 pm »

There's no doubt that the inline allows a more natural hand position...like eating a sandwich.

In terms of range, the 12 hole ocarinas have more range in principle, but that range is obtained by certain compromises in tone quality. Low notes may be weak or high notes airy. The
limitations are the result of the physics involved.

Personally, my best transverse ocarina experiences are with high C soprano models, which play pretty well.

Sent from my Passport using Tapatalk


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franko
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Re:
« Reply #11 on: November 30, 2015, 01:10:19 am »

There's no doubt that the inline allows a more natural hand position...like eating a sandwich.

In terms of range, the 12 hole ocarinas have more range in principle, but that range is obtained by certain compromises in tone quality. Low notes may be weak or high notes airy. The
limitations are the result of the physics involved.

Personally, my best transverse ocarina experiences are with high C soprano models, which play pretty well.

Sent from my Passport using Tapatalk

Thank you very much for your info for I have a lot of respect for your playing.  I have a question referring to your video playing the oriole C recorder with backing track of "This Masquerade".  Is that backing track in the key of Dm?  The reason I as is that I have been looking for a backing track and found one that is in Dm and sounds pretty close to the one you use. Will you comment on this or direct me.  Thanks, Franko


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ubizmo
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I couldn't fail to disagree with you less.


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« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2015, 02:45:49 am »

Yes, that track was in D minor.

Sent from my A0001 using Tapatalk


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